Connecting the Old Testament to the New Testament

The One Year® Chronological Bible, NKJV (Tyndale, 2013), October 12

imagesJesus’ authoritative teaching and miracles cause such a stir among the people that they question his identity. Some think He might be John the Baptist, while others think He might be Elijah, Jeremiah, or one of the prophets (Mt. 16:14).

Peter declares, “You are the Christ, the Son of the Living God,” when Jesus questions him regarding His identity (Mt. 16:16). In response to Peter’s questions, Jesus blesses him: “Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jonah, for flesh and blood have not revealed this to you, but My Father who is in heaven” (16:17). By revelation from the Father, Peter has connected the dots that pepper Israel’s story, and he joins a host of others who recognize the Messiah:

The Creation Era provides a messianic promise when God promises that the Seed of woman will crush the head of the serpent; He enfleshes that promise in a picture of redemption when He kills an innocent animal and uses the skin to cover Adam and Eve’s nakedness after they eat the forbidden fruit.

A number of dots appear during the Patriarchal Era. The substitute of the ram in place of Isaac pictures John 3:16, where the Heavenly Father sacrifices His Son for man’s sin. God also promises that Shiloh, to whom “shall be the obedience of the people,” will proceed from Judah (Gen. 49:10).

Numerous pictures of Christ appear during the Exodus Era. The Passover Lamb pictures the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world. The Day of Atonement foretells an acceptable eternal offering when the high priest sprinkles the blood of the goat on the mercy seat of the Ark of the Covenant, hidden away from man’s sight in the Most Holy Place. Moses speaks of the coming of another Prophet.

During the Conquest Era Joshua meets the preincarnate One, the Commander of the Army of the LORD, prior to the battle of Jericho. Rahab demonstrates saving faith during the Conquest Era. The red cord let down through her window symbolizes her trust in the promises of God.

David receives the promise of an enduring, eternal kingdom, while Solomon inaugurates the Temple of the LORD during the Kingdom Era and experiences the Glory of God entering the Temple.

During the Divided Kingdom, Isaiah receives promises about the Messiah–the Branch who will reign–concerning His birth from a virgin and His rule over the nations. He also reports on the Suffering Servant who will be “wounded for our transgressions.”

Sadly, during the Captivity Era, Ezekiel witnesses the departure of the Glory of God from Jerusalem’s temple. In Daniel, a fourth man, “like the Son of God,” joins Daniel’s three friends in the fiery furnace during Judah’s exile in Babylon.

Simeon recognizes the newborn son of Mary as “a light to bring revelation to the Gentiles, and the glory of Your people” (Lk. 2:32). John the Baptist recognizes Jesus as the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the World.

Peter’s confession aligns him with a growing number of witnesses. Jesus confirms Peter’s confession by declaring that his confession will be the corner stone of the church—Jesus ”the Christ, the Son of the Living God” (Mt. 16:16).

Peter embraces the Bible’s grandest Subject and sublimest Object—the Messiah!

Questions from today’s chronological Bible reading (Mk. 8:22-9:1; Mt. 16:13-28; 17:1-13; Lk. 9:2-13, 18-36):
Jesus speaks early and often about the suffering that He will face. How does Jesus view Peter’s response to His announcement regarding His suffering?
How does Jesus describe the lives of those who follow Him? What promise does He give to those who take up their cross and follow Him? What does this reveal about His own perspective?
Jesus dazzles His disciples with His glory as He is transfigured before them. How does Peter respond to Jesus’ transfiguration and the appearance of Moses and Elijah? Review 2 Peter 1:16-21. What does the transfiguration teach Peter about Jesus?