Bible Reviews

All chronological Bibles are not created equal!

Why do publishers produce chronological Bibles that differ in their chronology?

Each publisher has its own team of theologians who construct the timeline of the Bible according to their scholarship. The chronology that they develop is considered intellectual property of the publisher.

How do I choose which chronological Bible to read?

Tyndale offers three translations in their One Year® Chronological Bible (NLT, NIV, and NKJV). The NLT is a paraphrase and the easiest to read. The New King James Version is a solid word for word translation, while the NIV (2011) is considered “gender inclusive” and not endorsed by many conservative evangelicals. Thomas Nelson produces study Bible that follows their chronology. I prefer to read a chronological Bible without the clutter of commentary.

OYCB Review

OYCB Review2

* “Gender-inclusive” translation

“The controversy regarding the NIV11 is due to at least four factors. First, the revision poses serious questions regarding linguistics and translation theory. Second, it raises the questions of language change and the use of gender-related language—a volatile issue due to concerns regarding the radical feminist social agenda. Many are concerned that the NIV11 attempts to mollify such radical concerns. Third, personality issues are involved. Entrenched positions have been staked out by well-known biblical scholars and high-profile advocacy groups. Fourth, theological boundaries and doctrinal bias impact the nature of Bible translations. Before I assess the NIV11, we must think about each of these factors since they color one’s view of any new translation that touches on any of these areas.” Rodney J. Decker, An Evaluation of the 2011 Edition of the New International Version (The Gospel Coalition: The Melios Volume 36, Issue 3, November 2011).