Review, Review, Review!

The One Year Chronological Bible, NKJV (Tyndale, 2013), May 18

UnknownIsrael’s forefathers passed down their history to their children’s children. They were committed to Bible literacy, “What we have heard and known, and our fathers have told us . . . we will not hide . . . telling to the generation to come the praises of the LORD, and His strength and His wonderful works that He has done . . . that the generation to come might know them, the children who would be born, that they may arise and declare them to their children, that they may set their hope in God, and not forget the works of God, but keep His commandments” (Ps. 78:3-7). Faith in God comes by hearing His word (Rom. 10:17).

Knowledge always precedes faith; therefore, Bible literacy is crucial to the spiritual vitality of God’s people.

Chuck Colson assessed the world in which we live today, “If Christians fail to develop a biblical worldview, the future Christian Church will likely have an even more tenuous connection to biblical principles than we see today.” “Clearly the number one challenge to the Christian worldview is the secular-naturalistic worldview, which sees the universe and everything in it—including us human beings—as mere cosmic accidents. If there is no God, there can be no moral absolutes. We see the results of that way of thinking all around us.”

Bible literacy is more than an accumulation of biblical facts; it is the revelation of God Himself and His agenda to redeem ruined sinners. When the light of Bible literacy grows dim among God’s people, darkness will prevail within the culture.

The chronicler of Psalm 78 tracks Israel’s history. It isn’t pretty.

  • Exodus Era – Israel rebels against God in the wilderness “because they did not believe in God, and did not trust in his salvation” (78:22). In spite of God’s gracious and timely provision, “they did not believe” (78:32). “They did not remember His power” (78:42).
  • Conquest and Judges Eras – “Yet they tested and provoked the Most High God, and did not keep His testimonies, but turned back and acted unfaithfully like their fathers; they were turned aside like a deceitful bow” (78:56-57).

Why must Israel constantly review their history? So that they “may not be like their fathers, a stubborn and rebellious generation, a generation that did not set its heart aright, and whose spirit was not faithful to God” (78:8).

God “chose David His servant, and took him from the sheepfolds; from following the ewes that had young He brought him, to shepherd Jacob His people, and Israel His inheritance” (78:70-71). Under David’s leadership, Israel entered a new day. David’s passion for the Word of God infused Israel with a new heart for Him. The nation had a clear choice―biblical literacy or continued faithlessness. Would David’s descendants rise to the occasion? Would they differ from their forefathers? Would reviewing their history accomplish its purpose?

Questions from today’s chronological Bible reading (Psalms 75-78):
On what attribute of God does Psalm 75 focus, and how does that attribute lead to worship?
Review Genesis 49:10. What does Psalm 76 reveal about God?
What is the central message of Psalm 77?